February 5, 2021
Animation of the retrieved ocean surface wind speed (meters per second) over the period of 1 August 2018 to 31 December 2020, produced using the CYGNSS Level 3 Climate Data Record (CDR) Version 1.1 dataset, which provides wind speed data retrieved from the Delay Doppler Mapping Instrument (DDMI) aboard the CYGNSS satellite constellation. The dataset can be accessed from the PO.DAAC Portal at https://doi.org/10.5067/CYGNS-L3C11 (DOI: 10.5067/CYGNS-L3C11). More information about the CYGNSS mission and other datasets can be found here: https://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/cygnss.

January 28, 2021
Humans are reshaping the Earth. Not just the climate of Earth, but the planet itself. As the Earth warms due to human interference with the climate, the oceans rise. And covering more than two thirds of the planet’s surface it means the rising oceans are literally changing the shape of the planet we call home. And since the early 1990s, a single series satellites has captured this change with unbelievable accuracy. Built to measure changes in ocean currents, our sea level satellites have revolutionized our understanding of the oceans and now provide one of the most important records of how fast our climate is changing.

December 11, 2020
Animation of sea surface salinity from 31 March 2015 to 9 November 2020 based on the 8-day running mean version 5.0 Level 3 NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) dataset from JPL. The dataset can be accessed from the PO.DAAC Portal at https://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/dataset/SMAP_JPL_L3_SSS_CAP_8DAY-RUNNINGMEAN_V5  (DOI: 10.5067/SMP50-3TPCS).

November 17, 2020
This animation depicts gridded, daily volumetric water content estimated for the 0-5 cm surface soil layer between March 2017 and August 2020. These soil moisture data constitute the first land product from CYGNSS, a NASA Earth Ventures mission and satellite constellation for ocean surface remote sensing using a technique called GNSS-Reflectometry, and represent a starting point to explore land surface research applications using this promising new technique. The dataset can be accesses from the PO.DAAC Portal at https://doi.org/10.5067/CYGNU-L3SM1 (DOI: 10.5067/CYGNU-L3SM1)

October 29, 2020
For NASA scientist Severine Fournier, studying our planet knows no borders. Our changing ocean affects everyone across the globe. That’s why the new Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite, launching Nov. 10, is a truly international mission that will study our rising seas from space.

October 29, 2020
Our planet is changing. Our ocean is rising. And it affects us all. That’s why a new international satellite will continue the decades-long watch over our global ocean and help us better understand how climate change is reshaping our planet.

October 29, 2020
Studying sea level rise today will help us better understand its impact on tomorrow. After living in coastal Virginia and seeing the effects of climate change firsthand, Ben Hamlington is now researching sea level rise at NASA JPL. The launch of the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will provide new and better insights about our Earth’s changing ocean.

October 29, 2020
Earth’s surface is covered by 70% ocean. Rising seas caused by climate change affect everyone across the globe, from coastal communities to those living inland. Growing up in landlocked Zimbabwe, NASA JPL engineer Shailen Desai was far from the ocean but still experienced its effects on the climate. Now, he is contributing to an international effort to track our rising seas.

October 28, 2020
Animation of the retrieved ocean surface wind speed over the period of 1 August 2018 to 22 October 2020, produced using the CYGNSS Level 3 Science Data Record (SDR) Version 3.0 dataset, which provides wind speed data retrieved from the Delay Doppler Mapping Instrument (DDMI) aboard the CYGNSS satellite constellation. The dataset can be accessed from the PO.DAAC Portal at https://doi.org/10.5067/CYGNS-L3X30 (DOI: 10.5067/CYGNS-L3X30).

October 12, 2020
Animation of the estimated ocean surface latent (top) and sensible (bottom) heat fluxes over the period of 18 March 2017 to 31 August 2020, produced using the CYGNSS Level 2 Ocean Surface Heat Flux Climate Data Record Version 1.0, which provides the time-tagged and geolocated ocean surface heat flux parameters with 25 x 25 kilometer resolution using wind speed data provided by the Delay Doppler Mapping Instrument (DDMI) aboard the CYGNSS satellite constellation. The dataset can be accessed from the PO.DAAC Portal at https://doi.org/10.5067/CYGNS-C2H10 (DOI: 10.5067/CYGNS-C2H10).

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