Animations

January 28, 2016
Operational oceanography provides forecasts or near real time information of ocean conditions. This information can be used to assist in fishing, oceanic oil rig position or navigation so that these entities are prepared for poor or dangerous conditions and can take appropriate action. Sea level measured from Jason-3 is important for these forecasts as it provides information on what the current ocean conditions are and also the wave height. Please give credit for this video to: CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and Mira Productions

January 27, 2016
Coastal areas are subjected to erosion from waves breaking on shore and storms. Satellite altimetry from the Jason series can provide information on sea level rise, which can be used in planning beach renourishment to combat erosion.  To further understand coastal processes and monitor coastal erosion a new satellite mission, SWOT, will provide a finer resolution than what the current altimeters can provide. Please give credit for this video to: CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and Mira Productions

January 27, 2016
Ocean observations from satellite altimeters began with TOPEX/Poseidon in 1992 and continued with Jason-1, 2 & now 3, jointly managed by NASA, CNES, NOAA and EUMETSAT. These satellites have provided detailed observations of sea level rise, ocean circulation and climate change. Not only have they provided sea level heights, but also information on sea ice, hydrology and weather forecasting. Please give credit for this video to:CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and Mira Productions

November 29, 2015
The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña). This animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies (relative to the respective normal state) in the Pacific Ocean associated with the developing 2015 El Niño, the warm phase ENSO. SST anomalies reflect the heat content in the mixed layer (upper 50 meters).

March 23, 2015
Global surface wind vector flow lines colored gray from June 1, 2011 to October 31, 2011. The visualization show the directional flow and magnitude of surface wind vector data (calibrated to a 10 meter reference height) from June 2011 through October 2011.

March 23, 2015
Global surface wind vector flow lines colored by wind speed from June 1, 2011 to October 31, 2011. The visualization show the directional flow and magnitude of surface wind vector data (calibrated to a 10 meter reference height) from June 2011 through October 2011.

March 23, 2015
Global surface wind vector flow lines over sea surface temperature from June 1, 2011 to October 31, 2011. The visualization show the directional flow and magnitude of surface wind vector data (calibrated to a 10 meter reference height) from June 2011 through October 2011.

March 23, 2015
North Atlantic surface wind vector flow lines over sea surface temperature from June 1, 2011 to October 31, 2011. The visualization show the directional flow and magnitude of surface wind vector data (calibrated to a 10 meter reference height) from June 2011 through October 2011.

December 13, 2014
The animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) associated with the 2009-10 El Niño in the Pacific Ocean. The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña).

December 12, 2014
The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña).

Pages