You are here

Animations

March 23, 2015
Global surface wind vector flow lines over sea surface temperature from June 1, 2011 to October 31, 2011. The visualization show the directional flow and magnitude of surface wind vector data (calibrated to a 10 meter reference height) from June 2011 through October 2011.

March 23, 2015
North Atlantic surface wind vector flow lines over sea surface temperature from June 1, 2011 to October 31, 2011. The visualization show the directional flow and magnitude of surface wind vector data (calibrated to a 10 meter reference height) from June 2011 through October 2011.

December 13, 2014
The animation illustrates the evolution of sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) associated with the 2009-10 El Niño in the Pacific Ocean. The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña).

December 12, 2014
The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a quasi-periodic fluctuation of ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific. The temperatures generally fluctuate between two states: warmer than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (El Niño) and cooler than normal central and eastern equatorial Pacific (La Niña).

February 12, 2014
This visualization from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2013 shows sea surface temperatures (SST) associated with the Agulhas Current near South Africa at 1-kilometer (~0.6 mile) resolution. The Agulhas Current is a western boundary current that transports warm water southward in the Indian Ocean along the west coast of Africa. Near South Africa the current retroflects (or turns back on itself), called the Agulhas Retroflection, due to interactions with the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Eddies that form as a result of Agulhas Retroflection are clearly visible in the animation.

February 12, 2014
This visualization from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2013 shows sea surface temperatures (SST) in the Eastern Pacific near Central America at 1-kilometer (~0.6 mile) resolution. Cold SSTs are clearly visible off the Central American coast from October to March. Such cooling events are associated with accelerated winds that blow through gaps in the mountainous terrain of Central America.

February 5, 2013
This visualization celebrates over a year of successful Aquarius observations. Sea surface salinity is shown at various locations around the globe. The range of time shown is December 2011 through December 2012. The data continuously loops through this range every 6 seconds. This visualization was generated based on version 2.0 of the Aquarius data products with all 3 scanning beams.

February 4, 2013
This visualization celebrates over a year of successful Aquarius observations. Sea surface salinity in the northern hemisphere is shown as the globe slowly rotates. The data cycles through a single year, 2012, and repeats. Two versions of the visualization are provied: a version with dates and a scientific color bar and another version without dates and a simpler color bar. The range of time shown is December 2011 through Decemeber 2012. The data continuously loops through this range every 6 seconds. This visualization was generated based on version 2.0 of the Aquarius data products with all 3 scanning beams.

January 7, 2013
Animation showing the extent of MY sea ice (white), FY sea ice (light gray), and open water (darker gray) from June 20, 2002 – November 23, 2009. Sea ice extent was derived from QuikSCAT data. Provided courtesy of David Long, Brigham Young University.  Animation Link: QuikSCAT Arctic Sea Ice Classification and Extent (2002-2009) (~ 76 MB MPEG-4 File)

October 22, 2012
Using data from several satellite altimeters, a finer picture of the ever-changing height of the oceans is revealed. Swirling currents called eddies pepper the global ocean. Like small pock-marks in sea surface height, these eddies are found in every major ocean basin. Near the Equator, the eddies give way to fast moving features called Kelvin Waves. When they build up in the Pacific, these waves can usher in a phenomenon known as El Nino, which happens when warm water and high sea levels move into the Eastern Pacific along the Equator.

Pages